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within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant atten
as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representativ
insurance companies that incentives to take care of us. >> host: john goodman, when it comes to preexisting conditions, does the government have the rule and saying you need to ensure preexisting conditions? >> guest: yes, but she don't want to join the premium below the cost of care because the insurance company isn't going to want you and is going to treat you poorly. so what we recommend is being able to ensure an advance against preexisting conditions so if you have to pay a higher premium on insurance that pays a higher premium. but also we need affordable insurance. we don't have it dandruff on the care. if you own your own insurance, take a job to job. >> host: the employer system, is it time to not be the system? >> guest: i believe in free markets. employers do what they need to do. but let's have a level playing field. once in every state make it illegal for the employer to buy for employees insurance they can take with them for the next job. we need to abolish laws, turn everything around and encourage affordable insurance. >> host: what is the argument in favor of having it divi
into the ground. >> so could you give some examples, number one, of this network that you talk about in the u.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network of, for instance, vice president dick cheney. whether it's halliburton, other companies, they ended up unfairly taking up these and they didn't do a good job at all by virtue of the result -- [inaudible]. these can networks -- another can of such network, if you would like to look at the much bigger scale, the entire seven to $800 billion bailout is a function of a very quote unquote legal state business network that operates that allows our system to bail out people that have caused the problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria. the money is much smaller, and the checks and balances that what is the media or the democratic process, and other civil society associations and power
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
's forum is special for those who work at the presidential library and use the and it is a testimony to the hard work and dedication for those employs to work hard to preserve the nation's history and of president kennedy. this secret recordings of jfk which is now on sale sale, would not have been impossible if not for the incredible skills, talent, professional ism, dedication of our library staff in the. government employees. one person in particular rely to a knowledge its which is then archivist of these white house recording as the archivist who knows more about these taped conversations and any of the american. please join us to acknowledge all of our colleagues work here at the kennedy library. [applause] and we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us is presidential historian, ted widmer has selected the most compelling and important recordings then wrote annotations to put them into context. also ellen fitzpatrick professor of history at the university of new hampshire. also frequent contributor to our forum. tom putnam the outstanding director to bring energy to
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
out there i was telling you about flex c13 amount which is using it for great. do not forget you $20 off instantly for plank and approval of your credit carter hsn mastercard. we are going to check in quickly with our hsn spotlight. >>host: welt champion serena williams is returning tomorrow so tune in and check out her signature3 line tomorrow at hsn. to stay with us right now and all of you shoppers we have a great gift for all of those your list that you know what to get 4. it is call this one pencam with the video camera check it out after the commercial. [commercial] [reading] [♪ music ♪] >>host: well, i want to remind everybodykindle fire tablet we are about to cross 10,000 of mark beautiful and amazing tablets soul today. this is a third of our quantity sold today for the entire day and you can take home for under $40 with a credit3 of blacks payments and they do so much for your orders will process your order is as we can. we have lots of new customers to 9 and that's why we a little bit6 c13 the while you are all waiting patiently i want to discuss up fabulous idea.
, mobile banking. a whole a ray of services that we can now deliver because we are connected using this frontier technology. and that is such a powerful, powerful thing. it will have legs for the next 20 years, not to mention everything else that my friend talks about in his book on abundance, but it creates so many possibilities. >> who is the it coming prosperity written for? >> well, you know, it's written for the folks watching the show. and it's written for general audience in the united states but globally. i start in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes
take very seriously. i hope i don't finish this. this term, this year, my life to my being useful. i want to be useful. on my tombstone, he was useful. live the long time. i want to be useful. it i don't want just to say the words, i want to make a difference. >> you already are. i think you on behalf of not only a library of congress and the children's book council and every child, but on behalf of the audience and for our country , the wonderful job your doing. walter dean myers a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you. >> we continue our coverage of the international summit of the book with the panel tell the role of cultural institutions and foster in the future of the book. this is about 50 minutes. >> we are coming to the second session of our day which would be a panel discussion on the role of cultural ostentations and posturing and the future of the book. i will turn to the panel's moderator to introduce the panelists once we are all on stage. sir harold is a distinguished feature in publishing in journalism. i'm sure you've heard of him. president and publisher of rando
would like to thank hanna rosin, anita hill, thank you for joining us. .. now from freedom fest the annual libertarian conference held in las vegas. booktv sits down with peter, ceo and chief global strategist at the pacific capital incorporated and argues that his book the crash that we replaced the housing bubble with a government inflated a bubble that will eventually top and caused another economic collapse. this is about 25 minutes. >> now joining us on booktv is peter schiff, he is the author of the real crash, america's coming bankruptcy. how to save yourself and your country. here is the cover of the book published by st. martin's press. what do you think when you talk about a government goebel? >> let's go back. we had two big bubbles, we had the stock market bubble because initially the chief money supplied to the economy by the fed and the stock market has had a lot of the crazy stock is replaced by a larger bubble in the real estate in which we expanded this economy based on all of the false rules while people were spending money that they don't have come in and we h
" that sprung from the awful doldrums of the u.s. economy under jimmy carter apply stronger, more strongly today. >> house so click >> obama is the same kind of antibusiness president and insight president. same kind of managerial, interfering, strangling, surprising president jimmy carter was. >> you writing here about president obama. i want to get to the right page so i can quote it correctly, sir. you write under the obama administration that the u.s. had a morbid subversion of the infrastructures of its economy. the public sector has become a manipulative forest, aggressively intervening in the venture and financial sectors with guarantees and subventions that attract talent and debunking. >> the worst of this is the korean cast of the obama administration. the epa now has gained control over everything. see so to have been deemed a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald
he saw the pentagon's estimate, he wrote in the margin, i doubt it, it took us three months just to take sicily. when the spending requests came in, he said, i know the boys at the pentagon. he believed real national security was from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk, boy, we could use him today, who controlled government spending and taxes. the famous speech warning against the industrial complex was at the end of the presidency, but worked on it all along behind the scenes. heaven help us he liked to say when we get a president who knows less about the military than i do. it was not about the economy or saving money. in the berlin crisis and earlier crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953 over the strait in 1954-55 and 1958 in the suez crisis in 1956, he was planning a bigger gain for higher stakes. west point cadet and young army officer, ike was a great poker player, and, indeed, so good, he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from the fellow officers hurting his career. he switched to bridge, but he never forgot how to bluff. the soviets, he bluffed with nucl
joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >>
facebook page, posted six status ad updates, and he also had friends post things like on the wall,us like, got her in the bushes,frst telling where the guys were, and just like a big budget movie,teh theer cops break in, shootout, a goes to the hospital, the hostage is fine, but now theyakc are tryinomg to figure out whetr they can prosecute people fromes telling -- who told him wherebua the reswat team members were. you know, facebook is addictiveo a billion people on facebookw, making it the third largest nation in the world after india bo and okchina. th has cease and desist citizens, -- it has citizens, its ownits ow approaches, a and people are drawn to it like any new nation because of the sense of freedom. you could be an ordinary person, a scientist in a crowd sources project or could be a journalis reporting on what's going on in the world or if you're starting a band, you can, you know, get that with fans.hrough you can use facebook, twitter, youtube, and, you know, tolea topple a government. gove it's harder to put down aardto revolution occurring over the web than kill a chari
that is still with us. the volcker rule label was announced to the press by obama january 2010, paul volcker by their role. -- by the president. he heard his name and thought what is that? i think the phrase in the book describing paul volcker is the man who could find fault with the mona lisa. [laughter] he made a living saying no. goldberg 1970s one. inflation 1979. speculation 2010. the underlying story line is trust which is the title of the last chapter of the book you can go there and skip the stories obama appointed him chairman of the advisory board the former president of italy wrote paul volcker a letter that still sits in a coma frame on his desk that says we trust you. and i show how he earned the trust and to follow-up with the lessons he learned about trust and his father senior 1930 through 1950 had a quotation from george washington hanging in a frame behind his desk in a letter he wrote to his officers at the time it said do not suffer your good nature to say yes and you ought to say no. remember it is not a private cause to be injured urban if it did buy your car is" he has
that told the story. the war blur that richard nixon used to trap him in the cross-examination, and these things, they live in a mythological memory. it was in the "new york times" three weeks ago or so in a box, you know, a-11, a war blur appeared in new york city in manhattan, and times photographed it, making the reference to this work we're going to talk about today, and then, i think, a classic status was enhanced by the seemingly never ending decades of controversy in which the defenders tried to make slanders of the authors of witness stick. today, i want to introduce the three panelists. this is an amazingly powerful group we have here. all at once. leave it to them. they will take it over. each, i hope, making remarks ten minute, and we'll open it up for further discussion. elliot a -- abrams had a remarkable strings of enormous importance. i remember him going back to the early reagan years. he began my knowledge with human rights, and that was really something, the jimmy carter invention of human rights, and in charge of latin american affairs, positions
was the u.s. attorney, and it was sort of this crazy world wind of six weeks from when he had that conversation with me when i was actually confirmed and started serving as the special inspector general. >> was the date that you started? >> december 15th, 2008. >> what are your politics? nominated by the bush administration essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to vote, i have always been a registered democrat. it is kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approached me and asked if i was interested that john and i was sort of going through different excuses why i did not want to go to washington. very happy with being a prosecutor. the only job i ever won it. was getting married, but finally when all those arguments that failed i sort of said in a very dramatic way, by the way, you know that i am, in fact, a registered democrat. it kind of went die and that that i have the killer. and i entreated to barack obama just two weeks ago to his campaign. but it was not a political appointment, it was a merit appointment. th
. forbes discusses his book, "freedom manifesto," a follow-up to his book "how capitalism will save us." >> now joining us on booktv is magazine publisher, politician and frequent author, steve forbes, whose newest book is coming out in august of 2012 and it's called "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't." we are at freedom fest in las vegas, where mr. forbes is speaking. mr. forbes, why is that free markets are moreover, but that government isn't. with an example of that? >> remake the emphasis of big government. going back to it james madison defined. but in terms of big government not being moral, it is the opposite of what it purports to do and creates an environment we have less ability to get ahead increased dependency and not a sense of independence. it plessis crony capitalism, which hurts oil entrepreneurship and creativity. all the things the government says it does hopes the poor to make sure the markets: the right direction. they do the opposite. their short-term oriented, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't
, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take this on. when the spending request came in, ike would say i know those boys down at the pentagon. ike believed the real national security came from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk. he controlled government spending and package. his famous speech warning against military-industrial complex came at the end of his presidency but, in fact, he been working on it all a long. mostly behind the scenes. heaven help us, he liked to say, that we'll get a president who knows less about the military than i do. this approach to the military was not just about the economy. in the berlin crisis in 58-59 and in early crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953, 54, the almost straight, the suez crisis in 1956, eisenhower was playing a bigger game for higher stakes. a west point cadet and a young army officer, ike had been a great poker player. indeed, he was so good that he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from his fellow officers and it was hurting his career. he switched to bridge, but he never forgot how to b
increased use of natural resources. when he leaves london he takes new passport. they board a night train which departed london when they let out a cry of despair. in the rush i forget to switch off the gas lamp in my bedroom. well, he replies coldly. you'll be paying the bill. the gas lamp is the novel's running joke. true, it's only a smawt h small part of the total cost. we present day readers quickly realize the joke is on us. we're the first generation that has realize the planetary bill for fossil fuel is going to be. in the era, coal was a costly but essential part of modern progress. yet he steam powered exploit set at the height of imperial remits a phase of the past that it truly history meaning over and done with. airplanes have replaced the coal-burning engines in ship that hurdle them around the world. the protected some people including him at the expense of others have been replaced with other political regimes. it's no difficult to cross the surface of the world in 90 days to fly around in hours if you can afford the ticket and get the passport and the have visas. when i r
or t.a.r.p. bailout fund was mishandled. it's about 40 minutes. >> joining us now is neil barofsky, former inspector general for t.a.r.p.. you saw him earlier on the panel. here's the cover of his bestseller. it's called bailout. .. >> i was nominated by my boss, and it was this crazy whirlwind when i had that conversation and was serving. >> what was the date he that you started? >> december 15, 2008. >> what are your politics? you the bush administration, essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to go. vote. i have always been a registered democrat. it is actually kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approach me and asked me if i was interested in the job, i was going to different excuses as to why didn't want to go to washington. i was very happy being with a prosecutor. i was getting married. finally, when all those arguments had failed, i said in a very dramatic way, by the way, you know that i am, in fact, a registered democrat. and he kind of winced. and i thought i came back and said i contributed to barack obama t
and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have -- it was the invention of steam power but the creation of regimented european empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together made it just possible by the 18 70's t
. it was such a delicate, uncomfortable effort. u.s. military and it was a military oftentimes i say i'm army out of place. the military police had the mission sometimes to put down domestic disturbances that they occurred once every 100 years assumptive to that effect, clearly not the mission of the 82nd airborne are the 101st or even the marine corps who were present that morning. 19,000 troops. two units had prepared, had been given advance notice as to what they were doing and they prepared for it in riot control. why all of this for one african-american student who wanted to get an education? it's a brand name university. it's because the whole state was an insurrection from the government to to the statehouse itself statehouse itself down to the 11-year-old who were throwing bricks at us in the streets. it was total chaos, a little mayhem and even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away so there was your insurrection. it lasted two or three days. the violent part of it and then after that i was appointed to be the security officer for james meredith and went to school with him, or he went to
'll be great. and there were those of us at the time who said that's not going to work. and the reason we said back then is it's not going to work if you put in this year a big surge in government spending, even if that makes gdp go up this year, next year it goes down again. so if we're going to do to policies they're going to recommend, we had to know it would be great next year, and we could afford to lose the 2% growth, and we'd take the stimulus away. since that didn't seem plausible at the time, what we argued back then -- i could e-mail you testimonies -- was that we need to pursue policies somewhat reminiscent of what we see in the 4% growth chapter now. we were talking about what next steps should be, and there wasn't a democratic senator in that hearing who was willing to defend the stimulus on the record. and i was, i was being, you know, pretty combative in my testimony, and nobody argued with me. and the point is that the economy is still terrible. i think 2% is actually optimistic for what we're growing right now. and everybody wants to do something to fix it, and that's a great
cook. [applause] thank you all very much for joining us today. [inaudible conversations] >> now on c-span2, we bring you booktv, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books. here are some programs to look out for this weekend. at noon in light of congress discussing the so-called fiscal cliff, booktv highlights a few programs about economics. arlie hochschild. then tomorrow stephen han and sara gordon sit down with booktv to talk about their books. also on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern danny danon discussing his book, "israel: the will to prevail," followed by patrick tyler, author of "fortress israel: the inside story of the military elite who run the country and why they can't make peace." watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule can, visit booktv.org. >> strangle me -- [inaudible] >> give it to him hard! >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us, i think, in this country we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us had experienced
fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to compl
finished reading it. and the only word that came to my mind, and i have to confess, i never used this word, as i was a little bit uncertain, magisterial. the scope, dips, authority of the book was just really pretty staggering in terms of what your government. a lot of wonderful topics that people like me resonate to. net 1951, questions about derivatives, all sorts of questions and issues that about class stiegel. pretty interesting in terms of the depth and the capability of thinking about those issues. it turns out there should be careful using the word magisterial because i had to look it up. it means both authoritative and pedantic, don't mean it in that sense. >> i would like to start. often multinational corporations populated by the states and all depends on many states to see it , see to it that these things done. the american states have played an exceptional role in the creation of elite global capitalism and coordinating its management as well as restructuring other states to these ends. so i think it gives me a little frantic think a little bit of a what you've done your, and
, but it was my recommendation that created the u.s. holocaust memorial museum, the excision that led to that. i -- the commission that led to that. but during the clinton administration, i was ambassador to the european union, and i did as undersecretary all the holocaust negotiations. i negotiated $8 billion of compensation from the swiss, the germans, the austrians for slave labor, forced labor, looted art insurance, property restitution and the like. and here i'm really trying to look at this from the perspective of someone who's been a senior government official but also a leader in the jewish community. and that's why this book has been endorsed by both president perez and president clinton. >> stuart eizenstat, "the future of the jews." this is booktv on c-span2. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's our prime time lineup for tonight. beginning at 7 p.m. eastern time, nobel prize-winning author talks about the history of africa and the challenges facing the continent today. then at 8:15, a look at presidential inaugurations throughout history. at 9 p.m. eastern "after words" with c
. she said -- now, he said. mr. jefferson used large sums of money they been given to them for the benefit of the negro. when i first read this it really did make any sense at all. i did know what he could possibly be talking about and about something that was made up by people who are angry about slavery and wanted to get back at mr. jefferson. identify that it was true. visiting philadelphia one time i was wandering with my family through society hill, and became the house with a plaque that said this was the townhouse where the great polish patriot of the american revolution had lived, and was open as the museum. so we went into. right at the front there's a brochure entitled -- and jefferson. i did know that much of her relationship at all but i opened it up and i found to my surprise that he had written a will in which he left the jefferson $20,000 to free as many slaves, monticello slaves that money would buy. and to give them land and to give them livestock into pay for the transportation and education, transportation especially to someplace where they could live und
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehensiv
of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, big issues at stake and a president who's tall, cool, cerebral, pretty good at politics but doesn't like to admit it having to govern in a frack white house atmosphere. there is something that seems familiar about that. [laughter] so i want to do two quick stories about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, a office seeker from new york, goes to monticello trying to get an appointment. he was, would have fit right in this city even now. travels to lobby for the job. he was a burr l
, eventually after the last dictator, took his leave of us in nigeria and went to the service of god in the other world. and the next president in nigeria was a former military man also, who had been president, who happened to be from the south. now, remember, when the british left, they left power in the hands of the north. for eight years after that, after the military left, power was in the hands of the southerner. the ruling parties, however, inserted a principle which was just the same as the british left behind. power to remain in the -- the expression at the time was that power was just lent to the south for a few years. it must revert to the north, continue the tradition of the british. this is not very palatable, and unfortunately the president of the nation who took over after the previous one left, was a very sick man, and under the sharad -- let us say for about six months didn't know whether they were being ruled bay ghost or by a living being. it was really -- the drama that went around -- went on around the presidential. so eventually succumbed to nature, and the presi
. >> host: mr. rothkopf, is the u.s. on the right path in your view when it comes to the mix of business and government? >> guest: i think the u.s. has a lot of work to be done in this area. you'd know from just the recent presidential campaign where we spent $6 billion, and that most of that money came in one way or another from companies or people who worked for powerful companies, and was part of a bargain that exists in our society between special interests donors and their political beneficiaries, that their special interests will get pursued. and it's the first big election since citizen is united, where the supreme court ruled that money was speech, and that we couldn't regulate money, and i found that to be a real distortionary fact in u.s. life, and we're coming out of a period in which income inequality has grown more than ever in u.s. history. in which we have had gdp growth but job contraction, and social mobility is going down, and we have to ask ourselves, as companies gain influence, push government off their back in a regulatory base, grow in a free-wheeling way, and peop
, for example. who. but this is -- as i said, we used to know a heck of a lot about south africa. now that knowledge has faded. and now we are experts or semi experts on the middle east and about what region next. he knows. >> i think, you know, what you're saying, the intimation. the first answer to your question is stop reading the new york times. [laughter] much more than it used 210 or even -- >> my commentary. >> there is a sort of classic effort to say what is important and what is unimportant in accordance with an ideological schemes. you know, i don't think there's an answer to this, and it's very hard to get people to jump out of that sort of in the case of the times to liberal left, the view of the world. except over a long amount of time by pointing out to cognitive dissidence and disrupted -- discrepancies. i guess it's easier now in the sense that the state department, i remember work stopped at 630 to watch cronkite and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now
at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harvest of the shift, the fundamental shift and was able to take the intellectual life and breakthroughs of the enlightenment in europe and scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other because why would you sacrifice with someone for whom you had no common interest, and you could find that your individual rights and your individual being had come from nature or god and therefore couldn't be taking away from the hand of a king or the hands of a mob in the this is the moment that he embodies. its hierarchical moment to be alive in that very hour, a hugely important so here you have jeffer
pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atomic river above and below the n. no one in civilian authority, not even lincoln, had any detailed knowledge of the plans being prepared by the union's top general, george p. mcclellan. he was in secrecy assisted by a small clique of generals who shared his views of lincoln's policies. they were opposed. worse, mcclellan was rumored to be dying. with his plans die with him? under these circumstances, for the first and as far
can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the original tea party and tea party movement were about. far from being patriots, the original tea partyers were smugglers. some of them, among the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a
that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate to take apart our common sense to interrogate what we think we know to demystify, demythologize, move beyond the cliche about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of the forefathers especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is totally different story, the grounded benevolence, the life of joseph p. kennedy was an antique from house which if i looked at it long enough to reflect back to me often in pc and in distinct distorted form images of the events of people and places which organize and a range the story of 20th century america. >> as a historian i'm interested to tell you that the origin is of this book he introduced me to the kennedy family [inaudible] jean kennedy and investors that for the first time i was finishing up my first book and in my first biography i have used a treasure trove of materials that jean kennedy smith's daughter who is writing a collection was compiling a letters from her father to france and uncles had put me onto a
for joining us here in booktv for a few minutes. >> my pleasure, thank you so much. >> next, from the 12 annual national book festival, elizabeth dowling taylor presents her book, "a slave in the white house: paul jennings and the madisons." it's about 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. first i am a first time author, and i'm thrilled to be here. [applause] this was a true labor of love. i researched my topic for three years and spent a year-plus writing it. it is hummabling and gratifying to see it so well received, and to be following walter isakson, robert caro, and tony. [applause] i came to develop a strong interest in paul jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements
crier sis that began -- crisis that began in 2007 and is still with us. let me just say that the volcker rule label was announced to the press by president obama in january of 2010, caught paul volcker by surprise. not the rule, but the label. in fact, when he heard the president announce his name, he thought to himself: now, why did he do that? and that's why i say my favorite phrase in this book describing paul volcker is the man who could find fault with the mona lisa. [laughter] paul volcker made a living saying no. he said no to gold in 1971, he said to to inflation in 1979, and he said to to commercial bank speculation in 2010. but the underlying theme, the underlying storyline is trust which, by the way, is the title of the last chapter of book. it is six pages. you can go directly there, and you can skip all the stories if you want. when president obama appointed him, chairman of the president's economic recovery advisory board, prab, wrote paul volcker a three-word letter. that letter still sits in a chrome frame on his desk. it says: we trust you. and in this book i show how pa
next on booktv, robert watson looks at the history of scandal surrounding the intimate lives of u.s. presidents since 1789. this is a little under one hour. [applause] >> okay, can everyone hear me okay? i am robert watson. thanks for coming. welcome to lynn university, site of the third and final presidential debate this past the over 20 seconds and a quick note on some of those awards that i won for specific specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different ang
easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is to tell a different story, one grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of antique funhouse mirror which if i looked at it long enough would reflect back to me, often in hazy, indistinct, distorted forms, images of events, people, places which organized and arranged told the story of 20th century america. as a historian, i'm interested in origin, so i will tell you about the origin of this book. i was a colleague of arthur schlessinger or at the city university of new york. he introduced me to the kennedy family at a -- some event, i don't know what it was, a reception, a dinn
was absolutely fascinating. a good word to use if you don't know if a felon or a hero was fascinating is that it wants to do a biography. by that a year later, i saw jean kennedy smith again. she approached me and wanted me to do it, to write that biography. they recognize there is a need for such a biography. i said well, i'm in the mid-of writing another book by andrew carnegie. she said when he went to to be finished? you can't say no to a kennedy. i said i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day, we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if nav corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in ses
in the terror wars." >> military historian patrick o'donnell recounts the u.s. army's second ranger battalion's e. company, also known as dog company. the group was composed of 68 men whose military campaigns during world war ii, included landing on the beaches of normandy and the sense of pointe du hoc. it is about 40 minutes and starts now on booktv. >> thank you so much for having me here today. it's great to see so many of my friends here. this is a situation where things have come full circle in many ways. but today is the anniversary of the battle of falluja where i was embedded as a combat historian. on that day i will never forget we went to an aid station that was an al qaeda aid station. there was blood on the floor. it was quite a situation that was interesting but i'll never forget to i like look on the side of the walls. the light had changed. it was obviously a person that was running next to me on the other side of the wall. i had a sense of foreboding. seconds later, a marine was killed, along with a member of the iraq forces that were accompanying us. and it was a very poigna
historian patrick o' donnell recounts the u.s. army's second ranger battalion company, also known as "dog company". the group was composed of 68 men in a military campaign during world war ii including landing on the beaches of normandy and the ascent of point do hawk. it starts right now on booktv. [applause] >> thank you for having me here today. it is great to see so many of my friends here. this is a situation where things of come full circle in many ways. is a trite saying that today is the bat -- anniversary of the battle of volusia where i got started as a combat historian. on that day i will never forget we went through an aid station in -- and al qaeda aid station. there was blood on the floor and cots, a situation that was interesting. i will never forget looks on the side of the wall, the light had changed. there was obviously a person that was running next to me on the other side of the wall. i had this sense of foreboding. seconds later, a marine was killed along with a member of the iraqi forces that were accompanying us. it was a very poignant moment, shot in the head, the
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